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Monthly Archive for: ‘April, 2014’

L’Occitane to Pay $450,000 for Consumer Refunds in FTC Settlement

The FTC has approved the final consent order settling charges that L’Occitane, Inc. deceptively claimed that two of skin creams have body slimming capabilities and are clinically proven. The settlement requires L’Occitane to pay $450,000 for consumer redress, as well as prohibiting it from making future false and deceptive weight-loss claims.

The two products are Almond Shaping Delight, which sold for $48 for 7 ounces, and of Almond Beautiful Shape, which cost $44 for 6.7 ounces.  L’Occitane claimed that the skin creams would slim users’ bodies, even though they had no scientific evidence to support the claim.Read More

SEC Halts Pyramid Scheme Posing as MLM

At the request of the Securities and Exchange Commission, a federal court in Los Angeles has frozen the assets of a group of businesses that the SEC alleges to be operating a pyramid scheme masquerading as a multilevel marketing organization. The companies are based in California and Hong Kong and controlled by “Phil” Ming Xu, a California resident.

According to the SEC, businesses operating under the names WCM and WCM777 posed as multilevel marketing companies selling third-party cloud computing services. The SEC complaint alleges that they raised more than $65 million by falsely promising returns on investment of 100 percent or more in 100 days.Read More

FTC Attorney Covers Deceptive Representations at DSA Teleconference

The Direct Selling Association’s recent Code Responsibility teleconference featured a presentation on deceptive representations in earnings claims by FTC attorney Janice Kopec.

An earnings claim is a statement made by a company or its representative about the income an individual can earn from a business opportunity. The FTC requires any earning claims be presented in writing; any claims not supported by written documents are illegal.  According to Ms. Kopec, the Earning Claims Statement must include:

  • The name of the person making the claim and the date
  • The specifics of the claim
  • The start and end date those earnings were achieved
  • The number and percentage of your buyers who got at least that result
  • Any information about the buyers who got those results that might vary from prospective buyers – for example, where they’re located
  • A statement that prospective buyers can get written proof for your earnings claims if they ask for it

Kopec talked about how the FTC examines earnings claims to determine whether they comply with the rule. Aside from the basic criteria – whether a claim is material, whether the proper disclosure statements are provided, etc.  –  the FTC looks at how the typical consumer will perceive the claims. Read More